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. his upcoming book is entitled " can america have another great president?" aaron has served callus secretary of state's in the middle east, negotiating middle east peace that we will get to hopefully in another debate. he is also one of the most thoughtful writers out there today. riding daily on these foreign policy issues. leon is literary editor since 1983 and the author of nuclear war, nuclear peace against identity. i might mention that tonight is the relaunch of the new republic. it is really a new era and everyone is excited about that. we will be leaving to go to the new republic party. this is how it is going to go. we will start with 10 minutes from each team. leon will talk about why the u.s. should do more in the syria. that we will hear from josh and aaron on why the u.s. should not go any further. then the leon and bob will rebut their argument. i will begin a discussion by grilling the one or both of the teams on their arguments. the other side will have a chance to respond. each team will have three minutes to answer questions. their answers strike -- somebod
♪ >>> hello, welcome to "let's request america." i'm your host, kevin periera. we polled people across the country about a variety of fun subjects, and these four contestants are skyping from home. if they play a perfect game, one of them could take home $50,000. however, it will not be easy because at the end of each round, the person with the least amount of money will be eliminated. tony, gina, nikki, and jeff, are you ready to play? then it is time for "let's ask america"! >>> all right, the first question is worth $100. here are the two possible answers. we have the donut, or co-workers eyes. the question is, what did office workers say has more glaze at an office monday morning meeting? please welcome tony, everybody. what do you think it is? >> when i work at 9-5, the donuts were great, but i had a greater weekend. so i'll say eyes. >> next up, please welcome dina. >> thank you. >> what do you think is it the donuts or coworkers eyes? >> i don't have any donuts, but i have coworkers, and i have to go with coworkers. >> an event planner from california, please welcome nikk
good jobs to america? had we put people with skills that the jobs require? how do we make sure that hard work leads to a decent living? that begins with new jobs in manufacturing. after shedding jobs, manufacturers have added many jobs. what we need to do now is simple -- accelerate that. we need to launch manufacturing hubs across the country to have global centers of high-tech jobs. we need to make our task more competitive. we need to reward companies that create jobs here at home. we need to invest in the research and technology that will allow us to put more people back to work repairing our crumbling roads and bridges. this will help businesses expand and create new jobs. we need to provide every american with the skills and training they need to fulfill those jobs. let's start in their earliest years by offering high-quality recent goal to every child in america. they will be -- to every pre-s chool child in america. we cannot subsidize the soaring costs of education. we need to determine which colleges received certain types of federal aid. there are steps we can take t
one of these. by far, one of the most powerful weapons in america's arsenal and they're all legal. i'll talk to the texas attorney general and the owner of this store, that has become a mecca to many texans. >>> madman himself, ted nugent. it got pretty lively last time and i'm sure it will tonight. >> you're an american now. in america we have a second amendment right. >> this is a special edition from texas of "piers morgan tonight." i'm here at tactical firearms in houston, texas, with the owner, jeremy allseed. how has business been in this gun store since the sandy hook massacre? >> we've increased our sales four to five times. we were doing about a million dollars a month and started doing a million dollars a week until we sold out. right now it's impossible to get guns in, and ammunition. >> this pattern has been seen all across america. why? why are people, in the face of such a horrible massacre, are running out to buy guns? >> they feel they'll be banned and are running out to get whatever they can. the rumor is that they're going to try to ban anything beyond a ten-bullet
rates and demographics or what my friend phil long in town here at the new america foundation says it's like the tectonic plates shifting beneath the earth. demography isn't quite dead to me, but it's close. .. are we talking about a year, a few years, a decade, centuries, where is it happening? >> host: so the phenomena has begun in the west, it began around 1970. to back up quickly. the way we measure this is by simple birth statistics. it's not terribly difficult to do. when you have well organized societies to keep track of them you know how many people are born and their ages and their parent's ages. they calculate the birthrate, the general fertility rate and a total fertility rate. it's not a real number, in the sense that it's a hard and fast number. it's a statistical construct which means, basically, right now this very moment in time if every woman were to live to the end of her life having an average of number of children. what would the number be? america right now, for instance, that number is 1.93. the golden number for us, the golden number in all demographics is 2.1.
ironic that america is seemly drifting in this direction of economic european and asian because there is the colossal level of debt, the increasingly unaffordable warfare states, struggling banking systems come soaring levels of unemployment, stagnation or lubber economic growth, double even triple dip recession is, violence and riots etc. i think what europe is experiencing now is no ordinary recession. instead i think there is the sense that western europe's present economic crisis reflect deeper because of external pressures but rather because of some of the inherent contradictions and dysfunctional the that's encouraged by what i call european economic culture over long period of time. all of that is to say that if america's economic culture as i call it continues to drift in the same direction i think we can assume safely that over time some trends we see in europe start to manifest themselves in the united states and that i think is what americans mean when they use phrases like the european are becoming like europe. the first one to do is explain what my book means by the
>> this is "bbc world news america." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america." on the floor of the u.s. senate, protesters delay the confirmation hearing for america's next spy chief. teargas and riot police on the streets of tunis as the country's fledgling democracy struggles to survive a crisis we know it is not good for us but it is not fun, but why are so many people doing it? fledglingntry's democracy struggles to survive. we know that it is not good for us, but wire so many people doing it? welcome to our viewers on public television in america. america's drone program came -- undere nomination fire at the nomination hear
at the university of virginia. and on "washington journal," a look at gun ownership in america. >> several live events to tell you about today. the georgetown university law center host a daylong for him on, state, and local energy policies on c-span two at nine o'clock 30 eastern. also at nine o'clock 30 east -- also at 9:30 eastern, the us- india relations at the carnegie endowment for international peace. and they look at sequestration, and automatic spending cuts set to go into effect march 1 that will affect federal workers. that is a 2 --- that is at 2:30 p.m. eastern. >> from the start, we told the board that the approach we were going to take, pretty straightforward. remember, we were set -- sent there to fix gm. that was the mission. go make this thing a viable company again. so we were all focused, and brought the message we are going to design, build, and sell the world's best vehicles. we are going to move quickly, we need your support, your input, and so we changed a few things about the board meeting. we shortened them considerably. we stayed away from the details or did not get i
to expect when no one's expecting america's economic disaster" he discusses the implosion in the u.s. and its impact on the economy, culture and politics. this program last summer out in our -- lasts about an hour. >> host: welcome. there is a lot going on here and the main thesis is following the birth rate problem and what are the causes and consequences. along the way you touch on many topics including the rise of individualism in american life, the sustainability of social welfare programs, religion and population aging and we get to all of those in the next hour but first why don't you answer for me the question that every reporter is asked by his or her editor when that per approaches the idea why does this matter, why is it important? >> guest: it's important because the demographics are what my friend it's like the tectonic plates shifting beneath the earth and demography isn't quite destiny which is the oelwein sogegian know what the profile is than you are able to today what are the confines and the reality in this country. people are choosing to have fewer and fewer chil
's guest d'vera cohn. "what to expect when no one's expecting" america's coming demographic disaster. a in it mr. last discusses the population implosion in the u.s. and its impact on the economy culture and politics. this program lasts about an hour >> host: jonathan welcome. this is a very meaty book and there's a lot going on in here. the main thesis of course is the falling birthrate problem and what are the causes of those falling birthrates and the consequences. the rising individualism and and american lives in the sustainability of religion and population agents. we will get to those during the next hour but first why don't you answer for me the question of every reporter has asked by his or her editor when that reporter approaches with a story idea. why does this matter? why is it important? >> guest: it's important because the fertility rates and demographics are what my friend and demographer in town here says it's like the tectonic plate shifting beneath the earth and demography isn't quite destiny but it's close. once you know what the demographic profile country and soc
, particularly over the past five years. and in some respects i think it's rather ironic that america is seemingly drifting in this direction of economic european rises to stop economic european and asian. whether it is the plot -- colossal levels of debt, the increasingly unaffordable welfare states, struggling banking systems, stagnation or low economic growth, double, even triple-dip recession is, violence on the rise. there is an opinion that what you're experiencing now is no ordinary session. instead, i think their is a sense that western europe's present economic crisis reflects some deeper traumas. and not primarily because of external pressures, but rather because of some of the inherent contradictions. incurs protocol european economic culture overlong my time. america's economic culture continues to drift in the san direction, i think we can descend safely that over time some trends that we see in europe was there to manifest themselves in the united states. and that, i think, is what americans mean when they use phrases like europeanize asian or like becoming like your. so
insights to the america's cup and other major development opportunities along the water front. and now this financial plan update is included in the city's chapter and its second financial forecast and will be introduced to the board of supervisors in march. wallace the manager will take you through the presentation today as megan will show the financial forecast identifies the strong revenue growth five percent per year that is out out paced by the growth in the operating budget which has the individual of 3 percent per year. this is designated to capitol and expands and stabilizing our capitol budget and meets the port's policy to allocate 20 percent of the revenues each year to the plan, that said the forecast does identify opportunities and risks that the port should consider moving forward. and one such opportunity is the releasing of former america's cup sites and another opportunity and risk and related to the timing and scale of development near term and in some instances long term reductions to operating revenues directly impact our capitol repair and replacement budget. this
to every single child in america. [applause] every dollar we invest in high quality childhood education can save seven dollars later on by boosting regulation rates, reducing teen pregnancy, reducing violent crime. in states that make it a priority to educate our youngest children, like georgia or oklahoma, studies show students grow up more likely to read and do math at grade level, graduate high school, hold a job, form more stable families of their own. we know this works thomas a let's do what works and make sure none of our children. let's give that chance to our kids. [applause] [captions copyright nationalcable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed bynational captioning institute] make sure that a high school diploma puts our kids on a path to a good job. right now countries like germany focus on graduating their high school students with the equivalent of a technical degree from one of our community colleges. so those german kids are ready for a job when they graduate high school. they have been trained for the jobs that are there. now at schools like the tac in brooklyn a col
america. housekeeping, i have to mention some things. the way we're going to run this is as follows. i will do a brief and perfunctory introduction. and peter is going to get up and talk briefly about the book is obviously most of you have not read the book. this will become a stanley one-way conversation. after this will invite richard and james to say their piece on the book, and hopefully we can get stuck into a good discussion of smuggler nation and its aspects. at that point, we will open it up for q&a. you will see it is one fix microphone, and another mobile microphone for this side of the house. if you wish to join the q&a, please, if you're on this side get up and stand behind a microphone. we have to do it this way because there is no mobile microphone that we can use for recording for c-span, and we do what your questions and answers to be an integral part of this broadcast. so there we go. without any further ado i will begin my brief introduction, even though it was kind of redundant because obviously i've just an introduction well as to investing. so, here's the book. the
america helped put together, are a bunch of harvard educated liberal people that we would like to will syria in the future. because we hope that we can glue them on top of this islamic militia and quiet them down. we said exactly the same thing about iraq. what do we have? we have a shiite a picture ship. they were not secular. they were religious. the neocons got everything wrong on what would happen to iraq. it will get it wrong on what will happen in syria. mockers he is not happening in syria anytime soon. the only two social indicators that have any reliable connection to whether democratic experiments work, are median age and per capita income. those -- our median age is 30 and above, you stick to democracy 30% of the time. per capita income, about $10,000 per person. syria, the median age is 20 one years old. iraq it was 21. syria has a per capita gdp of about $1000. we are -- democracy is not going to be the outcome. we can see it by looking at the militias. the most able... are the islamic front. they're the ones that have taken all the military successes in the last f
"black and white america" and "made in germany" and the internationally acclaimed exhibition "concerned photographer." in addition, she has had independent careers as both a clothing designer and a real estate broker. she now lives in garrison, new york, in the hudson valley and works full time on leonard's prints and his legacy. brigitte was born in germany, and after living in the united states for over 40 years, he recently became an american citizen. [applause] um, dr. dyson is one of the nation's most influential and renowned public intellectuals. he's an essay contributor to the book. um, he published over 18 works of scholarly and cultural influence including "race rules: navigating the color line from 1996," "i may not get there with you: the true martin luther king jr. in the year 2000," "debating race" in 2007 and "april 4, 1968: martin luther king's death and how it changed america" in twawt. 2008. dyson's pioneering scholarship has had a profound effect on america ideas. dr. dyson is presently professor of sociology at georgetown university and cited as one of the 150 most p
stores in the state. i fired the most powerful we in america's arsenal and they're all legal. >> you're in america now and we have a special amendment right. this a is special edition. >> how has business been? >> right noi it's impossible to get guns and ammunition. >> this pattern has been seen all over america. why are people reacting by buying more guns and ammunition. >> i know my customers feel they will be banned. they need to get it now while they still can. >> what's the most popular? >> anything with over a ten round automatic. that's the rumor they will try to ban. >> do you think those are kind of things they should use in self-defense? >> for self-defense for your home or your property? >> home. >> for your home i like shotguns because you don't have to worry about missing. here in texas sometimes you live on 10, 20 acres. a shotgun wouldn't be very effective. >> do you believe any gun should be bann edbanned? >> i do not. >> why? >> it's not case of guns kill people. >> do you believe that the more guns there are in america, the safer the country is? >> in the hands of
. but that is extremely lucky. >> host: it in "the debt" what america owes to blacks you wrote what white society must be induced to do, own up to slavery and acknowledge its debt to slavery's contemporary victims. pay that debt and massive restitution's. rebuild the black esteem it destroyed by democratizing access to a trove of history's to which blacks contributed to prominently. when you talk about slavery's contemporary victims, what do you mean? >> guest: when segregation ended, there were those of us, and i was very fortunate to, a headstrong parents and an intact family. both of my parents had finished college. my father taught history in high school. my mother taught until she stopped to rear for children. and that meant everything to us. and so while we were damaged by segregation and we have a home. we had a family that was intact, that was sound and that was strong. 's so many people didn't have that, so they were exposed to the brute sharp edge of what was happening to them. and i think there were some of us who were in a position to move out once segregation ended. i was among that group
>> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america" reporting from washington. a suicide bomber strikes the u.s. embassy in turkey. killing two and injuring many more. as he tries to make his way into the building. saying good-bye to the secretary. hillary clinton bids farewell to the state department after four years at the helm. >> i hope that you will continue to make yourselves, make me and make our country proud. thank you all and god bless you. >> and seven years after hurricane katrina, the superdome in new orleans gets ready to host the super bowl in the big easy signature style. welcome to our
. >> do you believe that the more guns there are in america, the safer the country is? >> in the hands of the right people, yes. if you're going to do anything, i agree that people that have mental retardation or violent felons, they shouldn't have guns. they shouldn't have any rights. law-abiding citizens you should be able to do whatever you want as far as gun purchasing. >> let's fire some of these weapons. what are we going to start with? >> the jp enterprise. every time you pull the trigger one bullet comes out. >> this is a pure unmodified semi automatic? >> yes. >> it's a standard if you like ar-15? >> right. >> this is the weapon that's been used in the last five mass shootings in america including aurora and sandy hook. okay. the magazine is how big? >> this is 30 round capacity. it's standard. >> it's perfectly legal. weapon is ready to be charged. weapon is on safe. >> okay. shoulder the weapon. keep your finger out of the trigger until you're ready to shoot. take it off of safety. go ahead an shoot. >> once i got the hang of it and pressing the trigger faster and faster it
engine of america's economical growth, a rising and thriving middle-class. [ applause ] >> it is our unfinished task to restore the basic bargain that built this country. the idea that if you work hard and meet your responsibilities, you can get ahead no matter where you come from, no matter what you look like or who you love, it is our unfinished task, to make sure that this government works on behalf of the many and not just the few. that it encourages free enterprise, rewards individual initiative and opens the doors of opportunity to every child across this great nation. [ applause ] >> the american people don't expect government to solve every problem. it will doesn't expect us to agree on every issue but they do expect to put the nation's interests before party. [ applause ] >> they do expect us to forge reasonable compromise when we can. for they know that america moves forward only when we do so together. that the responsibility of improving this union remains the task of us all. our work must begin by making basic decisions about our budget decisions that will have a huge im
america. i am here today because the time has come for common sense comprehensive immigration reform. the time has come. now is the time. [applause] now is the time. [applause] now is the time. now is the time. [applause] i am here because most americans agree that it is time to fix the system that has been broken for way too long. i am here because business leaders, faith leaders, labor leaders, law enforcement, and leaders from both parties are coming together to say now is the time to find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see america as the land of opportunity. now is the time to do this, so we can strengthen our economy, and strengthen our country's future. think about it. we define ourselves as a nation of immigrants. that is who we are, in our bones. the promise we see in those that come here from every corner of the globe, that has always been one of our greatest strengths. it keeps our recourse young, a key to our country on the cutting edge, and helped to build the greatest economic engine the world has ever known. after all, immigrants help
a comprehensive immigration reform bill in the next few months and i will sign it right away and america will be better for it. host: president obama on immigration. you are looking at a live shot of the us capitol building. we are getting your responses to the state of the union. also, senator rubio's response. up next, akron ohio, emma kratz. caller: thank you. i was very pleased with thes speech. it was wonderful. i really agree with a lot of what he has to say. i know people don't, and that is why the country is the way it is. everybody has their own opinion. but rubio -- i have a hard time talking. he was so against everything. you could tell, he is tea party. he is ready to go against everything that the president would like to help the country. host: there was a tea party response delivered by senator rand paul of kentucky. you can see the full footage on our website, c-span.org. also, the full state of the union address and senator rubio's response is there as well. joel, independent color. caller: how are you tonight? host: fine. what did you make of what you saw? caller: unlike
about one of my personal heroes and friends and one of america's great yoss patriots, sam johnson. this month is cause for celebration as it marks 40 years, this nearly 600 american p.o.w.'s, including congressman johnson's set foot for soil after seven years. many of us could endure it for seven years, much less unbreakable strength, unpend ending faith in god, and constant hope this incredible man has. his captors named a die-hard, one of the few p.o.w.'s who refused to give in and cooperate with their anti-american propaganda. his fellow american prissness knew him as a leader, one whose spirit could not be broken whether he was in leg stocks or solitary confinement for four years, and his family knew him as their hero. a man who loved sofinge his country and was willing to sacrifice his life in defense of freedom. i'm honored to know him as a friend, through his 29 years in the air force he earned many distinguished recommendations awards, and merits. for those who had the pleasure of sitting at the dinner table with sam, you know those years were also filled with laughter and
. >>> good morning, america. this morning -- the face of a kidnapper. our first look at the man holding a 5-year-old boy hostage in an undergrown bunker. we speak to children. >> he said, i'll kill you all. >> and the abduction. >>> the voice. the man behind the manti te'o hoax. is it really him? >>> home alone. the 11-year-old hiding in the closet dialing 911 as burglars ransacked the family home. how his quick-thinking saved the day. >>> and are you ready for some ground hog? it's ground hog day and super bowl weekend. so, this morning, we're asked the ultimate question, can the ground hog predict the winner of the big game? meet staten island chuck. >>> it's also groundhog day. we should say this whole thing of animal predicting the weather, makes our meteorologist ginger zee mildly defensively. >> he sat next to me in thermal dynamics. >> it's the groundhog or me? make a choice. >>> good morning to everyone at home. we got you covered from the big easy, coaching brothers jim and john harbaugh will be on opposite sides tomorrow. they square off for the first time in a pregame
. we will put it all on the table. now they are just -- i mean, america, wake up. we have lost our rights. already, they are gone. host: let me ask you a follow-up question. do you have problems with the drone program in and of itself or do you have problems with how much you know about it? caller: i have problems with just the way the government has slowly eroded our constitutional rights and have told the people. if it is written down. we all know that we are not allowed to do this. that they can tap our phones and call it retroactively not illegal. they just do what they want. now they are blatantly doing it. as far as the drones go, they are flying over our country now. the conspiracy theory with a 9/11 -- i am not one of them. but that nsaa building -- nsa building in utah is doing something. they are collecting data. the drones are a continuation of the militarization of our country through militarizing our police. that is what they are doing. host: here is the counter opinion in "usa today," is similar opinion to what we have heard this morning. to shore up dubious democraci
compromise where we can, for they know that america moves forward only when we do so together, and that the responsibility of improving this union remains the task of us all. our work must begin by making some basic decisions about our budget decisions that will have a huge impact on the strength of our recovery. over the last few years both parties have worked together to reduce the deficit by more than $2.5 trillion, mostly through spending cuts, but also raising taxes on the wealthiest 1% of americans. as a result, we are more than halfway toward the goal of $4 trillion in deficit reduction the economists say we need to stabilize our finances. now we need to finish the job. the question is how. in 2011, congress pass said a law saying at a if both parties couldn't agree on a plan to reach our deficit goal, about a trillion dollars worth of budget cuts would automatically go into effect this year. these sudden, harsh arbitrary cuts would jeopardize our military readiness. they devastate priorities like education and energy and medical research. they would certainly slow our
is on the scene and filed this report. >> america's foreign missions are as much fortresses as embassies. this is why. this afternoon, a suicide bomber got to the gate of the u.s. embassy but but no further. his explosives detonated as a checkpoint. the bomber and a turkish security guard were killed. >> i wasn't sure what the explosion was. so i ran to see. they were body parts on the road. arms and legs but i didn't want to look any further. >> the attack on the embassy makes for a bitter last day of work for america's chief diplomats. >> i spoke with the ambassador and the team there. i spoke with my turkish counterparts and i told them how much we valued their commitment and their sacrifice. >> this is not the first time that western targets in curky have been hit -- turkey have been hit. in 2003 truck bombs hit targets in istanbul, including the u.k. consulate. those attacks were carried out by al qaeda affiliated groups. turkey says that this u.s. embassy attack was carried out by a leftist militant organization. the effect is the same. >> america is the target, there are nationali
. >> thank you, punxsutawney ginger. >>> now to our "good morning america" countdown to the super bowl. for the players, it's very serious business and a threat of a major concussion always hangs over the action. abc's jim avila has this exclusive look at this new cutting-edge technology that could save lives. >> reporter: at sports labs across the country, the race is on to find products that protect the brain and that can actually athletes of imminent concussion and brain damage. >> this is equivalent of running full speed and hitting a fully immoveable object. >> reporter: reebok and mc 10 just developed this mesh cap. it's worn underneath head gear lined with sensors that monitor the strength and number of hits to the head in any contact sport. using green, yellow and red lights to warn teammates, coaches, trainers, even parents in the stands of serious impact. so if i'm in the huddle, i would see this blinking light. >> yeah, i might say, jimmy, are you okay? >> reporter: it's called check light. >> think of it as an extra set of eyes. >> reporter: he played in the nfl for eight s
america's enemies but critics cite heavy civilian casualties and the u.s. relies on them too much. >> the drone is the only weapon that really frightened insurgents. it is ineffective. we cannot possibly kill these people one at a time and expect to come out on top. >> they are clearly not invincible. iranian tv has shown these pictures that come from a u.s. surveillance drone they captured two years ago. it's interesting timing. >> with me here in the studio is a former adviser to president obama's special up is that it to afghanistan and pakistan. you understand this area of the world very closely. how important is this to the national security? >> it has killed a number of al qaeda leaders but it has not decimated the organization completely. it has pushed them to move into other areas of the middle east. also, at a very high political cost. it does cause an enormous amount of anger in pakistan which has helped to spread extremism. the pakistan is feel that this has encouraged attacks on civilians. >> the drone program has been stepped up a lot by the obama administration. now,
doing it? welcome to our viewers on public television in america. america's drone program came -- undere nomination fire at the nomination hearing for john brennan. the man that president obama has tapped to be his next spy chief says that the white house goes through agony to make sure that there are no collateral deaths in these attacks. >> a panel of senators brimming with questions. barely a few words in, the first interruption but not from politicians. >> i am honored to appear before you today as the president's nominee. >> would you hold please? i will ask the police to please remove this woman. >> four times, protesters interrupted at the hearing. there was a vocal opposition to the program and to john brennan becoming the next director. he was questioned over his past involvement in enhance interrogation techniques. >> i've expressed my personal objections to my colleagues about certain of those situations such as water boarding, nudity, and others. i've expressed my personal objections but i did not try to stop it because it was something that was being done in a different part
, and latin-america. including cardinal le nard doe santri. and tim dolan from new york. however, being from a world super power could hurt his chances. it's the first time in six centuries that the cardinals will choose a pope while the previous one is still alive. benedict's resignation shocked the world. the 85-year-old pontiff has slowed down significantly in recent years, but the vatican stressed that no specific medical condition prompted this decision. >> he certainly slowed down a bit. you could tell he had trouble negotiating steps. he started using the cane several months ago. >> reporter: in his announcement, the pope said, quote,"i have had to recognize my incapacity to adequately fulfill the ministry entrusted to me." pope benedict xvi has overseen a series of scandals and controversy, including the sex abuse crisis in the catholic church. his critics charge he was not progressive enough, upset he condemned gay marriage, the ordination of women, and allowing priests to marry. but supporters viewed him as a steadfast leader, and praised him for warning against the subtle influenc
remarkable and inspiring journey back to the "good morning america" desk. >> keep it >>> from new york city, this is "nightline" with cynthia mcfadden. >> good evening and thanks for joining us. we begin tonight with a radical version of modern family. it is called pollyannary in which multiple lovers live together openly under one roof. two women and a man, programs, or in the example we're bringing you tonight, one woman and two men. but if that doesn't sound complicated enough, they're also raising a child together. here's abc's report we are an encore modern sex in america. >> this is the story, her lover, jon, her son, amon and her other lover ian. amon's dad. they're one big happy poly amorous family. a woman. her two heterosexual boyfriends and a child. living together in a comfortable suburban home just outside los angeles. >> starting to reflect on that building. >> what do you say to people who believe your relationship and the way that you're living your life is wrong? >> thank you for sharing your opinion. i mean, we're not here to convert people and tell people that monogamy is
the obama administration was looking at more steps to fulfill america's obligations to those innocent people in syria, but it is the threat here at home which also has the white house concerned. a series of automatic spending cuts known as sequestration will take effect at the end of the week if a deal is not reached in congress. it is the latest round of political brinksmanship in washington. secretary kerry warns that is the biggest threat to american power abroad. i spoke to the head of the council of foreign relations. he joined me from new york. what does the secretary mean when he says that it is congress that is the biggest threat to american power abroad at the moment? >> it has the advantage of being true. unless the united states economy begins to grow, now growing at about 60% of our historic rate, less than 2% as opposed to 3%, we have unpredictablility. chances of growth are going to go down even further if kundera -- government spending is cut through sequestration. all these things add up. the politics of the united ownes -- we have our domestic politicians who are increasingl
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